land of snow and glyphs


You can call me Arrows or a4p; other people who let me ride on their zombie dinosaur call me Kate.

"

I left Doctor Who because I could not get along with the senior people. I left because of politics. I did not see eye-to-eye with them. I didn’t agree with the way things were being run. I didn’t like the culture that had grown up, around the series. So I left, I felt, over a principle.

I thought to remain, which would have made me a lot of money and given me huge visibility, the price I would have had to pay was to eat a lot of shit. I’m not being funny about that. I didn’t want to do that and it comes to the art of it, in a way. I feel that if you run your career and– we are vulnerable as actors and we are constantly humiliating ourselves auditioning. But if you allow that to go on, on a grand scale you will lose whatever it is about you and it will be present in your work.

If you allow your desire to be successful and visible and financially secure – if you allow that to make you throw shades on your parents, on your upbringing, then you’re knackered. You’ve got to keep something back, for yourself, because it’ll be present in your work. A purity or an idealism is essential or you’ll become– you’ve got to have standards, no matter how hard work that is. So it makes it a hard road, really.

You know, it’s easy to find a job when you’ve got no morals, you’ve got nothing to be compromised, you can go, ‘Yeah, yeah. That doesn’t matter. That director can bully that prop man and I won’t say anything about it’. But then when that director comes to you and says ‘I think you should play it like this’ you’ve surely got to go ‘How can I respect you, when you behave like that?’

So, that’s why I left. My face didn’t fit and I’m sure they were glad to see the back of me. The important thing is that I succeeded. It was a great part. I loved playing him. I loved connecting with that audience. Because I’ve always acted for adults and then suddenly you’re acting for children, who are far more tasteful; they will not be bullshitted. It’s either good, or it’s bad. They don’t schmooze at after-show parties, with cocktails.

"


Christopher Eccleston (via thehellofitall)

FOREVER REBLOG THIS CLASSY ASSHOLE

(via k3llyb3an)

(via dashingforceofpalsy)

tonystarklordofwinterfell:

So, I was at lunch with a friend and his sister after seeing ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’, catching up on stuff and talk turned to the new series of Doctor Who - our expectations, Peter Capaldi, Jenna possibly leaving, the Matt Smith era - and his sister suddenly raises an interesting point.

"Isn’t the Matt Smith era kind of similar to Twilight?"

This caused both my friend and I to pause, and look at each other with a similar expression of puzzlement.

"Yeah - I mean the storyline is very similar," she continued "The main female character has to choose between two men from different races, makes her choice and has baby. Baby grows up abnormally fast, and ends up marrying the other man."

Despite how this theory glosses over some of the plot, it still kind of stunned me as I realisation slowly dawned on me.

I had watched a sci-fi variant of Twilight.

(via liamdryden)

my-flourish-and-blotts:

teacupsandcyanide:

I remember all the Doctor Who fanfics I used to read where Rose often got badly stereotyped as a damsel in distress whom the Doctor had to swoop in and save and smooch but the way I remember Doctor Who 90% of their relationship was the Doctor just setting Rose loose on people who had done something to offend them and sitting back giggling in the corner as she shouted

image

image

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setting Rose loose

(via thundersnow1)

:-/ finally watched The Time of the Doctor (like 8 months late). IDK I didn’t cry at all. Tied some plot lines together, more cheap potshots at churches. I liked the kids. 

Better idea: Eccleston!